ATAGI recommends three jabs to be considered 'up to date' with vaccines

ATAGI recommends three jabs to be considered 'up to date' with vaccines

Australians aged 16 and older will soon require a booster shot of a COVID-19 vaccine to be considered “up to date” with their immunisation after the nation’s leading medical advisory body recommended moving away from the term “fully vaccinated”.

The Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (ATAGI) put forward the new guidelines to serve “as the basis for policies for the public health management of the COVID-19 pandemic in a domestic context.”

The Federal Government has accepted the advice, noting it has secured more than 151 million booster doses for delivery over the next 12 months.

“Under the new advice, a person is ‘up to date’ if they have completed all the doses recommended for their age and individual health needs,” Minister for Health and Aged Care Greg Hunt said.

“ATAGI recommend that everyone aged 16 years and older receive a booster dose three months after their primary course, to maintain the best protection and an ‘up to date’ status.”

Under the new guidelines, anyone aged 16 and older will also be considered “overdue” for a booster shot six months after receiving their second jab.

In the event more than six months pass, ATAGI says the vaccine can still be “given safely and effectively.”

It also suggested that any state or territory planning to adopt the new definition should allow until the end of March to sufficiently implement the changes.

However, the shift will not apply to international arrivals.

“Appropriate vaccination requirements relating to international border settings are outside the remit of ATAGI and are a matter for other government policies,” ATAGI said.

The Federal Government has mandated booster shots in the aged-care sector, delegating power to states and territories to mandate it in other settings.

Children will continue to be considered ‘up to date’ without a booster, while severely immunocompromised people aged five years and older will require a third primary dose to meet the definition.

National Cabinet noted that the Omicron wave has peaked in most states and territories, as cases have fallen by 20 per cent since peak levels in mid-January.

Hospitalisations have fallen by 63 per cent since then, and ventilated cases have dropped by 54 per cent.

More than 9.5 million booster doses have been administered to 46.3 per cent of Australians.

ATAGI acknowledges that advice may change as the pandemic evolves.

Updated at 11.04am AEDT on 11 February 2022.

Help us deliver quality journalism to you.
As a free and independent news site providing daily updates
during a period of unprecedented challenges for businesses everywhere
we call on your support

Looking for a credit or charge card that’s built for your business? Try American Express
Partner Content
A good credit card should work for you, not against you, and let you and your business ...
American Express
Advertisement

Related Stories

Victorian Government lifts work from home recommendations

Victorian Government lifts work from home recommendations

With fourth dose vaccinations now available, more antiviral options...

COVID isolation time will be cut to five days, mask rules to be removed for domestic flights

COVID isolation time will be cut to five days, mask rules to be removed for domestic flights

National Cabinet has agreed to reduce isolation periods for COVID-p...

Fourth COVID-19 shot approved for over-30s

Fourth COVID-19 shot approved for over-30s

An additional 7.4 million Australians will be entitled to receive a...

New Zealand scraps pre-departure COVID-19 tests

New Zealand scraps pre-departure COVID-19 tests

Business travel and holidays to New Zealand are set to become less ...