Piping Hot partners with UTS to find the right algae-rhythm for sustainable fibre

Piping Hot partners with UTS to find the right algae-rhythm for sustainable fibre

(Photo provided)

Australian surf brand Piping Hot has announced it has partnered with the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) to transform the global polyester industry.

UTS has been commissioned to undertake innovative biomaterial research involving developing textiles made from seaweed, as part of Piping Hot’s investment in its mission to protect the oceans.   

Climate scientists from the university will shortly start building a prototype bio-based solution that aims to sequester carbon from the ocean, helping to reduce the environmental impact of synthetic fibres.

“Most organisations through lack of understanding are unwilling to future-proof and disrupt their operational and bottom-line status quo for the greater good,” Piping Hot Australia CEO and managing director Stan Wan told Business News Australia.

“Purpose-driven businesses like ours who are willing to transform for the greater health of our planet understand both the urgency and opportunities in a sustainable future.”

Piping Hot aims to help families save money by focusing on scalable solutions, and all its products are made with 100 per cent sustainable materials.

The business uses recycled polyester for its swim, apparel, accessories and footwear, which uses 62 per cent less energy, 99 per cent less water, and expels 35 per cent less waste than conventional polyester.

"It is an honour and privilege to partner with the distinguished Professor Peter Ralph and the UTS Climate Change Cluster,” Wan said.

“As part of Piping Hot's mission to defend the oceans, our purpose-led investment into marine biotechnology and material science is of vital importance.

“Together, we intend to impact change through marine science and transform the industry's reliance on fossil fuels.”

Wan believes Australia has so much untapped potential and could lead the world in the area of marine biotechnology and calls on the Australian government to do more to support marine biodiversity innovation and initiatives to protect Australia’s coastal and ocean habitats.

"We are delighted to be collaborating with Piping Hot on this exciting research project,” director, UTS climate change cluster Professor Peter Ralph said.

“The UTS Climate Change Cluster and Piping Hot are equally committed to a more sustainable future for our planet, and the development of sustainably sourced materials is crucial to achieving that goal. 

“Developing new nature-derived alternatives for the fashion and textile industries has the potential to revolutionise products and their impact on the oceans."

Piping Hot is a signatory to the UN Global Compact, the world’s largest corporate sustainability initiative, aimed at strengthening sustainable business practices to scale up impact and shape the world’s sustainability agenda.

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